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Dating not violence

Link them to someone else who can help them such as a parent, teacher, counselor, etc.

Specifically, people who got spanked as kids had a 29 percent higher risk for perpetrating dating violence, the findings showed.

That held true even after the researchers took into account the person's age, gender, parents' education and any history of child physical abuse.

Preventing Dating Violence Dating violence can happen to any teen regardless of gender, race, socio-economic status, or whether or not they have experience with dating.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 4 adolescents experiences verbal, physical, emotional, or sexual abuse from a dating partner each year. Dating violence includes any behavior that is used to manipulate, gain control, gain power; cause fear, or make a dating partner feel bad about himself or herself.

The study found that spanked kids tended to have higher odds of being violent toward their dating partners, researchers said.

"While we can't say that spanking causes later violence, it follows that if a kid learns that physical punishment is a way to solve conflict, he/she may carry that over into conflicts with later intimate partners," said study senior author Jeff Temple.

Consequences of Dating Violence Young people who experience abuse are more likely to be in fights or bring weapons to school, have higher rates of drug and alcohol abuse, and engage in high-risk sexual behaviors.

How to Help Teens Dealing with Dating Violence Teens who are in an abusive relationship may have a difficult time getting help.

Cyber – demanding texts/calls be answered immediately, looking though partner’s cell to check texts/calls/social media, demanding passwords to online accounts, tracking partner’s activity through technology, sending/posting or threatening to send/post inappropriate pictures/content, etc.

Financial – using money or resources to control their partner, buying gifts in attempt to keep their partner in the relationship and/or to make up for abusive behavior, making their partner depend on them for food/clothes/rides, etc.

Corporal punishment is communicating to children that violence is an acceptable means of changing behavior." It's estimated that about 80 percent of children worldwide are subjected to physical punishment, the study authors said. "Although mounting evidence shows the many detrimental effects of corporal punishment, many parents, much of the general public, and even some schools continue thinking this is an acceptable means to punish misbehavior," he said.