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At UMass he was a member of the National Society of Black Engineers. She probably told all the brothers in the room, and they’re gonna hate me when they find out”—she didn’t explain why. was a resident adviser in her dormitory—someone tasked with counseling other students—and at that moment, she wrote, “as my RA training kicked in, I realized I’d been sexually assaulted.” She wrote that while in retrospect she should have left if she didn’t want to continue the encounter, she hadn’t wanted to be a bad sport—“that UMass Student Culture dictates that when women become sexually involved with men they owe it to them to follow through.” She added, “I want to fully own my participation in what happened, but at the same time recognize that I felt violated and that I owe it to myself and others to hold him accountable for something I felt in my bones wasn’t right.”As she talked with her friend, R. The RAs called the campus police, who notified the Amherst police. Then she went to the hospital, where she was given a battery of medications for possible STDs.

In the early hours of Saturday, November 1, 2014, Bonsu, then a junior, was at the house where many of his fraternity brothers lived. M., who declined to be interviewed for this story, the two started talking and smoking marijuana; eventually they kissed. M., he could visit no dormitories other than his own, he was limited to eating at a single dining hall, and he was forbidden from entering the student union.

Imagine how peaceful and fun the world would be if more men allowed themselves to get a Boy-to-Girl Transformation, to literally walk in women's shoes?

At many schools, the rules intended to protect victims of sexual assault mean students have lost their right to due process—and an accusation of wrongdoing can derail a person’s entire college education.

He was also required to get counseling to address his “decision-making.”Bonsu decided never to return to UMass.

He applied to universities in other states, but was not accepted.

This is the first story in a three-part series examining how the rules governing sexual-assault adjudication have changed in recent years, and why some of those changes are problematic.

Read the second installment here, and the third one here.

Bonsu’s lawsuit describes the period that followed as one of extreme stress, during which he lost weight, contracted pneumonia, and was forced to drop two courses because the restrictions placed on him precluded him from attending class during his midterm exams. By then he was living back home in Maryland, sick a second time with pneumonia and in a state of emotional collapse.